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Sunday, May 10, 2020 | History

2 edition of Rice grain properties and resistance to storage insects found in the catalog.

Rice grain properties and resistance to storage insects

B. O. Juliano

Rice grain properties and resistance to storage insects

a review.

by B. O. Juliano

  • 103 Want to read
  • 37 Currently reading

Published by International Rice Research Institute in Manila .
Written in English


Edition Notes

SeriesIRRI research paper series -- No.56
ID Numbers
Open LibraryOL13809381M

Stored Product Protection iii Part I – Ecology of Storage Systems 1. Introduction 1 David W. Hagstrum, Thomas W. Phillips, and Gerrit Cuperus 2. Biology, Behavior, and Ecology of Stored Grain and Legume Insects 7 Linda J. Mason and Marissa McDonough 3. Biology, Behavior, and Ecology of Stored Fruit and Nut Insects 21 Charles S. Burks and Judy. a snapshot of common pests found in stored grain in Australia. The tolerance for live storage pests in grain sold off-farm either for the domestic, human-consumption market or for the export market is nil. With more grain being stored on-farm growers need to identify pests early and monitor – at the very least – File Size: 2MB.

ZHANG Qi-jun, et al. Breeding and Identification of Insect-Resistant Rice by Transferring Genes, sbk and sck 21 China) was conducted according to its manuals. A test line and a control line on the test strip was positive (containing Bt gene protein) and denoted as ‘+’. Only one detective line was negative (no Bt poisonous protein) and denoted as ‘-’. insects. Grain insects are present on most farms in harvesting machinery, stockfeed, grain spills, and old seed. Some of the insects fly between farms and between storages, and others walk or are carried in handling equipment. Unless insect control measures are applied, grain quality and value is .

accelerate mold and insect development within the grain mass, increasing grain losses. Storage infesta-tions may originate in the field by highly mobile insects leaving the storage site and flying to grain standing in the field. They may also move to newly stored grain from fields and infested grain File Size: 1MB. Rice storage pests include insects, pathogens, rodents and birds. These pests cause losses through a combination of feeding, spoiling and contamination of both paddy and milled grain.


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Rice grain properties and resistance to storage insects by B. O. Juliano Download PDF EPUB FB2

PDF | On Jan 1,Bienvenido O Juliano and others published Rice Grain Properties and Resistance to Storage Insects: A Review | Find, read and Author: Bienvenido O Juliano. The physicochemical factors contributing to rice resistance to stored-grain insects include tight hull, degree ot milling, grain hardness, high amylose content and high gelatinization temperature of endosperm starch, and low moisture content.

These are the granary weevil, the rice weevil, the maize weevil, the lessor grain borer or Australian wheat weevil, and the Angoumois grain moth. Other insect species or groups of species described in this handbook can cause great damage to grain if storage conditions are.

This book on insect pest management in stored rice was written for students at the postgraduate level and includes, in addition to a review of published information, the results of research work carried out in India.

The first part of the book contains a list of 17 species of insect pests of stored rice, and general information on storage losses, factors affecting infestability, sources and Cited by: Many insect species are associated with stored grain and grain products, but only about 50 are injurious, either occasionally or frequently (Cotton ).

The more common species are listed in Table Photographs and drawings of these and other stored-product insects are contained in Agricultural Handbook (USDA/ARS ).Cited by: 7. The rice seed germplasm of the Chongtui variety (CI), which was shown to contain no LOX-3 using monoclonal antibodies, was especially resistant to storage insects: damage by insects in rice varieties without LOX-3 was times lower than in varieties with LOX-3 after 42 months of storage (Suzuki et al., ; Zhang et al., ).

insect pests in the rice after it is placed in storage. Strict sanitation on the farm, in elevators, warehouses, and mills, and the storage of rough and milled rice in structures that are tight enough for fumigation can do much to prevent serious losses from insect attack.

The bulletin discusses the use of methyl bromide, hydro. Grain Storage and Pest Management 3 1 Introduction The purpose of any grain storage facility is to prevent grain loss from weather, moisture, rodents, birds, insects, and microorganisms.

Rice storage facilities take many forms depending on the quantity of grain to be stored, the purpose of storage, and the location of the Size: KB. A serious pest of most stored grains: the Lesser Grain Borer has developed resistance to a number of grain insecticides.

KEY FEATURES: ¢ Dark brown cylindrical shaped beetle (up to 3mm long) with club-like antennae ¢ Viewed from the side the beetle’s mouth parts and.

Losses caused by Sitophilus oryzae (L.), Rhyzopertha dominica (F.), and Sitotroga cerealella (Olivier) in 6 commercial varieties of rough rice from the Southern United States were assessed as weight loss of rough rice, loss of milling yield, and loss of monetary value. Over 3 insect generations, S.

oryzae caused the least damage, probably because this species requires grains with gross hull Cited by: Insect Control in Stored Grain Insect infestations in storage can come from grain residues in combines, handling equipment, and old grain left in storage.

Correctly drying, aerating and managing stored grain minimizes the risks of insect infestation and damage. Insect activity goes with moisture accumulation and grain heating.

infested by insects. The key to successful storage is to anticipate and prevent potential problems through good bin management practices. Preventing insect problems in stored grain requires 3 steps: 1) sanitation, 2) protection and 3) inspection.

SANITATION Stored grain insect infestations rarely begin in File Size: KB. Using both traps and a standard insect sieve (2 mm mesh) are the most effective methods of detecting grain pests.

Insect sieves should have a white tray that makes it easier to see small insects. After sieving, hold the tray in the sunlight to encourage insect movement. Cereal Grains: Properties, Processing, and Nutritional Attributes provides a complete exploration of the scientific principles related to domestication, morphology, production, and storage of cereal grains.

It also describes their physical and chemical characteristics and explains how these properties relate to industrial processing and. development of most stored grain insects and pests. In addition to actual moisture content of the grain, the volume of stored grain also affects the rate of cooling.

Practical storage conditions are summarized in Figure 1. Figure 1: Practical storage conditions. Adapted from Appert, 2.

Resistance to grain protectants and fumigants. Grain quality evaluation of world rices is a much-needed data base of selected grain quality characteristics of milled rice from all countries producing more than % of the world’s rice.

Quality characteristics and preferences are discussed by country based on information ob- File Size: 9MB. Rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae) An adult lays up to eggs singly in holes chewed in cereal grains.

Each egg hatches into a white, legless larva, which eats the grain from the inside. The larva pupates within the grain and the adult then chews its way out. The. Weevils in grain storage facilities can be difficult pests to control.

There are many species, such as the rice weevil (Sitophilus oryzae), maize weevil (Sitophilus zeamais), and the granary weevil (Sitophilus granarius). These weevils are easily identified from other grain insects by their long proboscis or snout. weevil, along with the closely related rice weevil, is among the most destructive of all stored grain insects.

The larvae develop inside kernels of whole grain in storage, thus making an infestation difficult to remove in the milling process. In Indiana, the granary weevil is largely a pest of stored wheat, corn, and barley, especially in. The process of heating grain in the sun to kill insects is called solarization.

It is an old age practice by farmers before storing the grains and pulses in regions where the outdoor temperature reaches 20 °C or higher (Chua and Chou, ).The solarisation time is varied based on the products, the dried grains are chewed to determine whether the grains are dried to satisfactory level.

The growing frequency of resistance to phosphine in storage insects constitutes a problem, previously discussed, but does not generally invalidate the use of this fumigant which can still be expected to provide effective control of the major pest species when treatments are carried out using proven techniques (Taylor, ).Stored product pests gain access to the grain storage from the standing crop in the field to various stages of grain processing and storage.

Although, about one thousand species of insects have.In rice, insect damage during storage can be the result of contamination, grain consumption or heating. Insect contamination of grain occurs when insects or their products (frass, webbing, castings) are found in the grain beyond a certain threshold of acceptance.